<!DOCTYPE html>
<html><head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
</head><body><div class="_1mf _1mj" style="direction: ltr; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; position: relative; text-align: left; white-space: pre-wrap;" data-offset-key="9k5j2-0-0"><span style="font-family: Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;" data-offset-key="9k5j2-0-0">This is an excellent discussion of the issue over defining 'where space begins, 100 km or 80 km or somewhere else. Not mentioned is an even more relevant event, two months ago, when a Soyuz manned launched failed while reaching 97km into space before falling back. The American on board, Nick Hague, is a USAF Colonel. Does he get the USAF 'astronaut wings' even though a NASA spokesman has declared "NASA does not consider the mission a 'space flight'."  </span></div><div class="_1mf _1mj" style="direction: ltr; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif; position: relative; text-align: left; white-space: pre-wrap;" data-offset-key="2etds-0-0"><span style="font-family: Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;" data-offset-key="2etds-0-0">https://www.theverge.com/2018/12/13/18130973/space-karman-line-definition-boundary-atmosphere-astronauts</span></div></body></html>