<br>
<br>
----------<br>
Sent from AT&T's Wireless network using Windows Live Hotmail<br><br><html>
<head>

</head>
<body>
<br>
-----Original Message----- <br>
From: Roberto Labanti <rlabanti@GMAIL.COM><br>
Sent: 3/21/2013 7:44:36 PM <br>
To: HASTRO-L@listserv.wvu.edu <HASTRO-L@listserv.wvu.edu><br>
Subject: [HASTRO-L] Fwd: NASA Technical Reports Database Goes Dark <br>
<meta name="Generator" content="Microsoft Exchange Server">
<!-- converted from text --><style><!-- .EmailQuote { margin-left: 1pt; padding-left: 4pt; border-left: #800000 2px solid; } --></style><font size="2">
<div class="PlainText">Perhaps of interest.<br>
<br>
Best,<br>
Roberto<br>
<br>
Source: <a href="http://www.fas.org/blog/secrecy/2013/03/ntrs_dark.html">http://www.fas.org/blog/secrecy/2013/03/ntrs_dark.html</a><br>
<br>
> NASA Technical Reports Database Goes Dark<br>
> Secrecy News / Steven Aftergood, 21/03/13<br>
><br>
> This week NASA abruptly took the massive NASA Technical Reports Server<br>
(NTRS) offline.  Though no explanation for the removal was offered, it<br>
appeared to be in response to concerns that export controlled information<br>
was contained in the collection.<br>
><br>
> "Until further notice, the NTRS system will be unavailable for public<br>
access. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause you and<br>
anticipate that this site will return to service in the near future," the<br>
NTRS homepage now states.<br>
><br>
> NASA Public Affairs did not respond yesterday to an inquiry about the<br>
status of the site, the reason for its suspension, or the timeline for its<br>
return.<br>
><br>
> NASA Watch and The Unwanted Blog linked the move to a statement from Rep.<br>
Frank Wolf on Monday concerning alleged security violations at NASA Langley<br>
Research Center.<br>
><br>
> "NASA should immediately take down all publicly available technical data<br>
sources until all documents that have not been subjected to export control<br>
review have received such a review and all controlled documents are removed<br>
from the system," Rep. Wolf said.<br>
><br>
> In other words, all NASA technical documents, no matter how voluminous<br>
and valuable they are, should cease to be publicly available in order to<br>
prevent the continued disclosure of any restricted documents, no matter how<br>
limited or insignificant they may be.<br>
><br>
> "There is a HUGE amount of material on NTRS," said space policy analyst<br>
Dwayne Day. "If NASA is forced to review it all, it will never go back<br>
online."<br>
><br>
> Essentially, the mindset represented by Rep. Wolf and embraced by NASA<br>
fears the consequences of unauthorized disclosure more than it values the<br>
benefits of openness.  It is a familiar outlook that has wreaked havoc with<br>
the nation's historical declassification program, and has periodically<br>
disrupted routine access to record collections at the National Archives, as<br>
well as online collections at the CIA, the Los Alamos technical report<br>
library, and elsewhere.<br>
><br>
> "I'd also note that a large amount of historical Mercury/Gemini/Apollo<br>
documents that were previously available at NARA Fort Worth is now<br>
apparently withdrawn due to ITAR [export controls]," said Dr. Day.<br>
><br>
> The upshot is that the government is not an altogether reliable<br>
repository of official records. Members of the public who depend on access<br>
to such records should endeavor to make and preserve their own copies<br>
whenever possible.<br>
</div>
</font>
</body>
</html>