Yes indeed, David, I have been meaning to read that paper for a while now.  I think someone did make a match between a canal and Valles Marineris, which is certainly understandable.  And some of those cities on the Martian desert which were canal hubs were the massive Tharsis volcanoes.  Yet still, a world without a Dejah Thoris is a lesser place in certain ways.  Larry<br>
<br>
----------<br>
Sent from AT&T's Wireless network using Windows Live Hotmail<br><br><html>
<head>

</head>
<body>
<br>
-----Original Message----- <br>
From: David Portree <dsfportree@hotmail.com><br>
Sent: 1/1/2013 10:29:25 PM <br>
To: ljk4@msn.com <ljk4@msn.com>, fpspace@friends-partners.org <fpspace@friends-partners.org>
<br>
Subject: RE: [FPSPACE] Fwd: [HASTRO-L] Astronomy history via ADS full text statistics?
<br>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Tahoma
}
--></style>
<div dir="ltr">Larry:
<div><br>
</div>
<div>Carl Sagan wrote an ICARUS piece on the correlation of the martian canal network with Mariner 9 data in the 1973-1974 period. He used a rigorous methodology and found almost no correlation. So at least as late as that scientists were looking at the canal
 issue.<br>
<br>
David S. F. Portree<br>
<br>
<a href="mailto:dsfportree@hotmail.com">dsfportree@hotmail.com</a><br>
<a href="mailto:dportree@usgs.gov">dportree@usgs.gov</a><br>
 <br>
<a href="http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/beyondapollo/" target="_blank">http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/beyondapollo/</a> <br>
 <br>
<font size="2"><font size="2"><a href="http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/people/david-portree" target="_blank">http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/people/david-portree</a><br>
</font></font> <br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
<div>
<div id="SkyDrivePlaceholder"></div>
<hr id="stopSpelling">
From: ljk4@msn.com<br>
To: fpspace@friends-partners.org<br>
Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2013 17:14:19 +0000<br>
Subject: [FPSPACE] Fwd: [HASTRO-L] Astronomy history via ADS full text statistics?<br>
<br>
<br>
<br>
----------<br>
Sent from AT&T's Wireless network using Windows Live Hotmail<br>
<br>
<br>
-----Original Message----- <br>
From: dfischer@ASTRO.UNI-BONN.DE <br>
Sent: 1/1/2013 3:24:07 PM <br>
To: HASTRO-L@listserv.wvu.edu <br>
Subject: [HASTRO-L] Astronomy history via ADS full text statistics? <br>
<style><!--
.ExternalClass .ecxEmailQuote
{margin-left:1pt;padding-left:4pt;border-left:#800000 2px solid;}

--></style><font size="2">
<div class="PlainText">The three-part article on Martian canals in the astronomical literature<br>
<br>
<a href="http://airminded.org/2012/12/22/the-canals-of-mars-1861-1970-i/" target="_blank">http://airminded.org/2012/12/22/the-canals-of-mars-1861-1970-i/</a><br>
<a href="http://airminded.org/2012/12/30/the-canals-of-mars-1861-1970-ii/" target="_blank">http://airminded.org/2012/12/30/the-canals-of-mars-1861-1970-ii/</a><br>
<a href="http://airminded.org/2013/01/01/the-canals-of-mars-1861-1970-iii/" target="_blank">http://airminded.org/2013/01/01/the-canals-of-mars-1861-1970-iii/</a><br>
<br>
is probably more interesting for its methodology than for its conclusions<br>
(which, after so many graphs and words, is simply that there was<br>
"lingering interest" in Martian canals for decades after Antoniadi<br>
seemingly closed the issue in 1909) - is this a valid approach to<br>
"data-mine" vast amounts of literature? There is *no* way to find out<br>
whether an article represents an original study pro or contra the<br>
existence of the canals or is simply a historical review!<br>
<br>
Incidentally if you run "Martian canals" through<br>
<a href="http://books.google.com/ngrams/" target="_blank">http://books.google.com/ngrams/</a> - which some historians *are* promoting as<br>
a new great tool to figure out the popularity of certain terms over time -<br>
you get basically the same graph: nothing at all before the 1880's, a peak<br>
around 1908 - and "lingering interest" til today, with a modest second<br>
peak around 1960. All that in about 2 seconds ...<br>
<br>
Daniel<br>
<br>
P.S.: Here's something else to ponder re. methods - the "small step"<br>
affair. Neil Armstrong always contended - including in his authorized<br>
biography - that he came up with his famous words between touchdown and<br>
stepping out of the LEM. Yet now his brother has claimed in an interview -<br>
see e.g.<br>
<a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/9770712/Neil-Armstrongs-family-reveal-origins-of-one-small-step-line.html" target="_blank">http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/space/9770712/Neil-Armstrongs-family-reveal-origins-of-one-small-step-line.html</a><br>
and<br>
<a href="http://cosmiclog.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/12/30/16252879-how-neil-armstrong-practiced-that-one-small-step-line-for-the-moon" target="_blank">http://cosmiclog.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/12/30/16252879-how-neil-armstrong-practiced-that-one-small-step-line-for-the-moon</a><br>
and<br>
<a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2255346/Did-Neil-Armstrong-lie-origins-small-step-speech-And-did-fluff-lines.html" target="_blank">http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2255346/Did-Neil-Armstrong-lie-origins-small-step-speech-And-did-fluff-lines.html</a><br>
- that he was shown the line by Neil on a piece of paper before Apollo 11<br>
even left Earth. Not that this has any impact on the history of space<br>
research but it throws some light on the value of oral history. Figuring<br>
out which light is left as an exercise to the reader ...<br>
</div>
</font><br>
_______________________________________________ FPSPACE mailing list FPSPACE@www.friends-partners.org http://www.friends-partners.org/mailman/listinfo/fpspace</div>
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>