[FPSPACE] London Sunday Times

Keith Gottschalk kgottschalk at uwc.ac.za
Mon May 8 19:44:26 EDT 2017


Maybe Bigelow Hotels would like to buy ISS & repurpose it? Or Space X?

- Keith

On Mon, May 8, 2017 at 10:44 PM, LARRY KLAES <ljk4 at msn.com> wrote:

> Get a rocket motor or two and launch ISS into solar orbit. Also place
> already existing instruments aboard so it can do studies of interplanetary
> environment. We've got plenty of objects circling the Sun going back to
> 1959 that haven't hit anybody yet.
>
>
> My other plan is to place as many items aboard ISS representing humanity
> as possible and send it into deep space for future historians to study. I
> know this idea will fly even less than the other one but I figured at this
> point why not say it anyway.
>
>
> Sorry, but the idea of all that work, lab space, and already spent money
> ending up as charred debris at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean is offensive
> to me on multiple levels.
>
>
> Larry
>
>
>
> Sent from Outlook <http://aka.ms/weboutlook>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Charles, John B. (JSC-SA211) <john.b.charles at nasa.gov>
> *Sent:* Monday, May 8, 2017 4:05 PM
> *To:* LARRY KLAES
> *Cc:* fpspace at lists.friends-partners.org
>
> *Subject:* Re: [FPSPACE] London Sunday Times
>
> Sure.
> Step 1: send money.
> Step 2: don't do other stuff in space because of money spent on Step 1.
> Step 3: don't complain because of Step 2.
>
> Less snarky answer. Everything costs money. Liability costs alone for an
> orbiting mothballed behemoth would be tremendous. NASA cannot afford to
> mothball and preserve more than a few facilities on Earth--which won't ever
> decay and fall onto 90% of Earth's populated areas.
>
> Sorry. Appreciate and utilize ISS while you still can, before it becomes a
> memory.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On May 8, 2017, at 14:56, LARRY KLAES <ljk4 at msn.com> wrote:
>
> And at the risk of sounding horribly pragmatic, think of the all the
> debris it can "collect" out of Earth orbit, sparing any more useful
> operational satellites in the process.
>
>
> I too would hate to see the ISS get trashed just because it may be
> perceived as inconvenient to maintain a decade or so from now. I am certain
> there are any number of nations and organizations that would love to
> have the ISS or at least rent space on some it. Ideas include a tourist
> hotel, a way to test those plans to put modular manned stations in lunar
> and Mars orbit, and sections dedicated to various small space manufacturing
> businesses such as pharmaceuticals.
>
>
> Nothing like having a space structure already in place that just needs a
> little fixing up rather than having to launch a whole new collection of
> modules and such.
>
>
> Larry
>
>
>
> Sent from Outlook <http://aka.ms/weboutlook>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* FPSPACE <fpspace-bounces at mail.friends-partners.org> on behalf of
> David R. Woods <drwoods at stny.rr.com>
> *Sent:* Monday, May 8, 2017 3:44 PM
> *To:* fpspace at lists.friends-partners.org
> *Subject:* Re: [FPSPACE] London Sunday Times
>
> Folks,
>
> I have often thought that ISS is so big, has cost so much, and has
> delivered such a lot of scientific information, that politics will prevent
> its being destroyed using reentry.  Like some sort of national historic
> treasure it might be moved into a much higher orbit for posterity.  Parts
> do wear out and systems do fail, but it could be mothballed and put into a
> hibernation state available for researchers into the distant future.
>
> Dave
>
> -------- Forwarded Message --------
> Subject: [FPSPACE] London Sunday Times
> Date: Mon, 8 May 2017 16:19:18 +0000
> From: Max White <bmews at hotmail.com> <bmews at hotmail.com>
>
> This piece seems more a plug for the sci fest sponsored by the Times, than
> anything else. So why is Roscosmos talking of operations extending to
> 2028...
>
>
> International Space Station to go down in a blaze of glory
> Plans are being drawn up to scrap the vessel and send it hurtling into the
> ocean in a spectacular firework display
>
> Jonathan Leake, Science Editor
> May 7 2017, 12:01am,
> The Sunday Times
>
> The station has travelled more than 115m miles over 20 years
>
> Nasa scientists are drawing up plans to dismantle the International Space
> Station and send it hurtling into the Pacific in the world’s most
> spectacular demolition job.
>
> Tim Peake, the British astronaut, could be among the team that prepares
> the ISS for its fiery demise — he is due to return to the station between
> 2021 and 2024 — when its funding runs out.
>
> The massive modules, fuel tanks and other components would generate a
> series of fireballs as they burn up in the atmosphere.
>
>
>
> h
> Jonathan Leake follows the ISS’s incredible journey
> The plans were revealed by Ellen Stofan, Nasa’s chief scientist, who
> helped set them in motion before recently leaving the agency.
>
> “The future of the ISS is a big issue for Nasa. The funding is there till
> 2024 but then it must start moving money to human Mars missions.
>
>
> “If we keep it fully funded after 2024 it will compromise the Mars budget
> and by 2028 it will start failing. It is huge, the size of a football
> pitch, so the overall plan is to drop it into the Pacific.”
>
> Stofan will be describing the plans when she speaks next month at the
> Cheltenham science festival.
>
> Construction of the ISS began with the launch of the first modules in
> 1998, since when humanity has had a continuous presence in space. One idea
> is that the platform could be dismantled with some elements brought back to
> earth while others remain in space — a decision which depends on the
> Russians, who own several sections.
>
> Another is that from 2020 the ISS could be opened up to commercial
> flights, including tourism. This is linked to Boeing’s development of the
> Starliner, a spaceship that will take people into low orbit, including the
> ISS, from 2020.
>
> Stofan said Nasa’s future lay not with the ISS but another more ambitious
> space station — orbiting the moon. But even this would be just a staging
> post. “To get to Mars we would need a transfer station. That means
> launching the modules for a Mars space ship and assembling them in an orbit
> around the moon.”
>
> David Parker, director of human spaceflight and robotic exploration at the
> European Space Agency (ESA), a partner in the ISS project, said the space
> station had taught scientists about surviving the health hazards of space
> which can include brain swelling, eye damage and skin problems — but its
> research value would decline.
>
> Pointing out the ISS cost the ESA about £300m a year, he said: “Our plan
> is to free up this money from the mid-2020s to explore beyond low earth
> orbit . . . that will eventually mean de-orbiting the ISS.
>
> “The south Pacific is the target and it will be a huge fireworks display.”
>
> THE ISS IN NUMBERS
> 1998 construction started
> 227 astronauts have lived on board
> 412 tons makes the ISS the largest-ever space structure
> 664+ days Peggy Whitson will have spent in space when she returns in
> September, setting a record for continuous stay
>
> _______________________________________________
> FPSPACE mailing list
> FPSPACE at mail.friends-partners.org
> http://lists.friends-partners.org/mailman/listinfo/fpspace
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> FPSPACE mailing list
> FPSPACE at mail.friends-partners.org
> http://lists.friends-partners.org/mailman/listinfo/fpspace
>
>

-- 


Disclaimer - This e-mail is subject to UWC policies and e-mail disclaimer 
published on our website at: 
https://www.uwc.ac.za/Pages/emaildisclaimer.aspx



-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.friends-partners.org/pipermail/fpspace/attachments/20170509/44cbc6eb/attachment-0001.html>


More information about the FPSPACE mailing list