[FPSPACE] Chang'e-2 -- why the silence?

John Charles jbcharle at gmail.com
Sat Jan 19 07:54:44 EST 2013


Geert, many thanks!
John Charles


On Fri, Jan 18, 2013 at 11:54 PM, Geert Sassen <geertsassen at gmail.com>wrote:

> **
>
> Good day,
>
>
>
> for those who haven't seen it yet, there is a very interesting
> presentation online with Chang-e-2 results at
>
>
>
>
> http://www.lpi.usra.edu/sbag/meetings/jan2013/presentations/sbag8_presentations/TUES_0930_CE_Toutatis.pdf
>
>
>
>
>
> Kind regards,
>
>
>
> Geert Sassen
>
>
>
>
>
> On dinsdag 08 januari 2013 11:56:41 you wrote:
>
> Thanks, Geert.
>
>
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: Geert Sassen <geert at navtools.nl>
>
> To: James Oberg <jameseoberg at comcast.net>
>
> Cc: fpspace at friends-partners.org
>
> Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2013 4:41 AM
>
> Subject: Re: [FPSPACE] Chang'e-2 -- why the silence?
>
>
> As far as I know several pictures have been taken, at least one more,
> close-up, picture was shown on Chinese TV and probably there are more.
>
>
> Other instrumentation was not activated, as has been stated in several
> media. In fact, the pictures were taken with one of the engineering
> camera's (the one which was originally used to picture the deployment
> sequence of the solar panels). The real observation camera in the science
> package was not used as this is a push-broom type of camera (like most
> similar camera's) which would have required the whole spacecraft to slew in
> order to make correct images (as Mars Express did during Phobos
> encounters). This is a more complicated manoeuvre and would have resulted
> in only one or two pictures at the very most, and even then only if they
> managed to pinpoint the target good enough to get it into the camera view.
> Using the engineering camera was a 'quick and dirty' method of getting
> images, but it did require a very close passage as this camera was
> obviously never intended for tele-shots of faraway targets.
>
>
> As I see it, the whole encounter was primarily a engineering-test for
> similar missions in the future, not much science results were expected.
>
>
> Regards,
>
>
> Geert Sassen.
>
> On Tuesday, January 8, 2013, James Oberg wrote:
>
> So, a month after a sensationally-impressive asteroid fly-by, and not
> another peep out of the Chinese news media? ONE photograph returned, no
> other instrumentation active? Even then it's worth celebrating rather than
> forgetting about completely.
>
>
>
> What are we missing?
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Geert Sassen
> http://www.facebook.com/geert.sassen
> ------------------------------
>
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>
>
> --
>
> Geert Sassen
>
> https://www.facebook.com/geert.sassen
>
> Email: geertsassen at gmail.com
>
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-- 
John Charles
Houston, Texas
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